A timely systematic review assesses value of mobile apps for CVD

  • Choi JY & al.
  • J Nurs Res
  • 2 Jun 2020

  • curated by Emily Willingham, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • The authors of this systematic review of mobile apps for cardiovascular disease (CVD) management find some benefit of the apps for self-management of hypertension and ischemic heart disease (IHD).
  • Complications and QoL could be improved with use of these apps, they say.

Why this matters

  • Hypertension and IHD both require close management, even as patients experience lengthy periods without symptoms.

Key results

  • 12 of 17 included articles were rated as “acceptable,” 1 was fair, and 4 were poor quality.
  • Mean participant age was 47.5-73.8 years.
  • Interventions lasted 3 weeks to 12 months.
  • App-based interventions involved monitoring, education, and reminders.
  • BP was reduced in association with app use in 5 of 7 included studies of hypertension.
  • 5 articles measuring medication adherence found improvements with app-based medication reminders, especially with IHD.
  • BMI was reduced in 2 of 3 studies of app-based intervention for IHD.
  • QoL was improved in 3 IHD-related studies.
  • 2 randomized controlled trials found no benefit of apps for smoking cessation in IHD.
  • Effects of the apps were inconsistent, depending on both app- and user-related factors.
  • Effects seemed to diminish with time.

Study design

  • Systematic review that included MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL searches plus 3 Korean databases.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Limitations

  • Some studies were low quality.