AAN 2019—Acute flaccid myelitis: most children recover some function in 4 months


  • Daniel M. Keller, Ph.D
  • Conference Reports
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Most children with acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) gradually regain motor function after various appropriate treatments.

Why this matters

  • The number of AFM cases has been increasing since first reported in 2012.

Key results

  • AFM affects a subset of children with acute flaccid paralysis.
  • There is a sudden onset of muscle weakness/paralysis in 1 limb with predominantly gray matter involvement.
  • Treatment was intravenous (IV) corticosteroids, IV immunoglobulin, plasmapheresis, or fluoxetine.
  • Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores decreased from 4 at disease onset to 2.5 at 3-6 months (P=.007).
  • At a single-center site at 4 months after disease onset, 11/12 (91.7%) had partial motor recovery with residual deficits, 1 (8.3%) fully recovered, and 1 (8.3%) had no improvement.

Study design  

  • Retrospective chart review of outcomes of AFM cases in Canada in 2018.
  • Children (n=29) were
  • Upper and lower extremity muscle outcomes were assessed using the Medical Research Council grading system (MRC). Functional outcomes were based on the EDSS.
  • The motor outcome metric was the time to MRC ≥3 in 3 out of 5 muscle groups evaluated.

Limitations

  • Small cohort size.
  • Heterogeneous treatment.
  • Retrospective analysis.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit