AAN 2019—Depression symptoms linked to later stroke risk


  • Daniel M. Keller, Ph.D
  • Conference Reports
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Takeaway

  • The level of depressive symptoms in an older adult population is associated with a heightened risk of ischemic stroke during follow-up.

Why this matters

  • Elevated depressive symptoms were common in these older adults and were associated with a 75% increased ischemic stroke risk.

Key results

  • 198/1104 (18%) participants, Center for Epidemiological Studies–Depression Scale (CES-D) ≥16.
  • At baseline, more depressive symptoms in women (P<.0001 and hispanics>
  • At mean 11 years follow-up, cumulative stroke incidence of 13%: CES-D
  • Models controlling for sociodemographic, health behavior, or cardiovascular risk factors produced adjusted HRs of ischemic stroke for CES-D ≥ vs

Study design

  • MRI substudy of the Northern Manhattan Study conducted in New York and Miami.
  • Community-dwelling adults ≥55 years of White, Black, or Hispanic ethnicity.
  • Stroke-free at baseline.
  • Self-reported depressive symptoms on CES-D (≥ vs
  • Funding: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Limitations

  • Relatively small sample size and stroke incidence.
  • Observational study does not suggest a causal association.

Expert comment

  • Lead author Marialaura Simonetto said the effect of treatment for depression has not yet been analyzed.

 

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