Adolescent food allergies associated with adult-onset atopic dermatitis

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Takeaway
  • Adolescents with food allergies were more prone to developing atopic dermatitis (AD) as adults.
Why this matters
  • Previous research has shown that patients with early-onset AD often develop food allergy.
  • Whether late-onset food allergy leads to adult-onset AD is unknown.
  • Adult-onset AD is a newly recognized phenomenon.
  • Itching/skin issues associated with AD can cause insomnia, poor school/work performance, and undermine QoL.
  • First study to describe chronological and dose-dependent development of AD in adults who had food allergies in adolescence.
Study design
  • Retrospective nationwide cohort study including 2851 patients >12 with food allergies and 11,404 matched control patients for 14 y.
  • Data from National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan.
  • Funding: The Taiwan Ministry of Science and Technology and Chang Gung Medical Research Program.
Key results
  • Patients with food allergies were more likely to develop AD.
  • The more food allergies a patient had, the greater the risk of developing AD.
  • Cumulative incidence of AD in patients with ≥3 food allergies was 7.18% after 14 y.
Limitations
  • Information was based on diagnosis codes, and information on specific allergens was not available.
  • Accuracy of diagnosis may vary depending on physician.