Adult-onset asthma: more daily physical activity linked to slower long-term lung decline

  • Loponen J & al.
  • Eur Clin Respir J
  • 1 Jan 2018

  • curated by Jenny Blair, MD
  • Clinical Essentials
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Among patients with adult-onset asthma (AOA), decline in lung function is slower in the subgroup with higher levels of daily physical activity. 
  • Authors advise recommending daily physical activity in AOA guidelines.

Why this matters

  • Consensus is lacking on best AOA treatment. 
  • Previous long-term studies have not addressed daily physical activity (as opposed to exercise) for asthma.

Key results

  • Low- vs high-activity group:
    • Between Max0-2.5 and 12-year visit, both FEV1 and FVC fell faster; 
    • For example, annual prebronchodilator FEV1 change/year was −58.8 vs −41.4 mL (P=.001);
    • No difference in inflammatory biomarkers.
  • On multivariate analysis adjusted for sex, age, BMI, atopy, medication, and smoking, low daily physical activity remained predictive of faster annual FEV1 decline (P<.001>

Study design

  • As part of the single-center Seinäjoki Adult Asthma Study (SAAS) of 201 patients with AOA.
  • Participants included smokers; some had comorbidities.
  • Researchers compared self-reported physical activity levels at year 12 to lung function at baseline, maximum in first 2.5 years of diagnosis (Max0-2.5), and at year 12.
  • Funding: Finnish nonprofits, hospitals.

Limitations

  • Causation not established.
  • Max0-2.5 postbronchodilator values were not measured.
  • Activity assessed only at 12-year mark and was not measured with accelerometers.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit