Alcohol-related hospital admissions in Welsh children and adolescents

  • Trefan L & al.
  • PLoS ONE
  • 1 Jan 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

A new study published in PLoS One highlights the epidemiology of alcohol-related emergency hospital admissions in Welsh children and adolescents. The findings showed that females and the most deprived individuals had a higher likelihood of hospital admission for alcohol-related reasons.

Researchers collected e-cohort data on alcohol-related emergency hospitalisations in Welsh children and adolescents aged 10 to 17 years (n=2968) from the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage Databank.

Overall, alcohol-related hospital admission rates witnessed a decline from 2006 to 2011. Females demonstrated higher admission rates than males up to 16 years of age; however, for the age group of 17 years, males had a slightly higher rate of admissions. The admission rates increased with increasing levels of deprivation. The last three days of the week accounted for 70 per cent of the admissions, with Saturday being the peak day. The duration of alcohol-related emergency admissions was less than a day for almost 60 per cent of cases and less than two days for 92 per cent of cases. Admissions associated with intentional self-harm were higher in females than in males, whereas admissions resulting from injuries, head injuries or falls were higher in males than in females.

"These findings show that alcohol-related harm is still prevalent among children and young people and better targeted intervention practices and policies are needed," the authors concluded.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit