Alcohol-related hospitalisations in Scotland

  • Information Services Division Scotland
  • 19 Nov 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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The Information Services Division Scotland has published updated statistics on alcohol-related inpatient and day case activity in general acute and psychiatric hospitals. The period covered in the report for general acute hospitals is 1981-1982 to 2018-2019 and for psychiatric hospitals is 1997-1998 to 2018-2019.

Key findings from the report are as follows:

  • In 2018-2019, 38,370 alcohol-related hospital admissions were recorded in general acute and psychiatric hospitals. This figure was comparable with that of the previous year (38,199).
  • Of those admitted for alcohol-related conditions, 93 per cent received treatment in general acute hospitals and the rest in psychiatric hospitals.
  • Of those admitted to general acute hospitals for alcohol-related conditions, almost half (12,033) were admitted for the first time, while others accounted for multiple admissions.
  • From 1981-1982 until 2007-2008, there was a steep and sustained rise in general acute alcohol-related admissions, peaking at 855 per 100,000 population in 2007-2008. This has now declined to 669 per 100,000 population.
  • Men had a 2.5-fold higher likelihood of admission to general acute hospitals for alcohol-related conditions than women (971 vs 377 per 100,000 population).
  • Individuals living in the most deprived areas had a six-fold higher likelihood of admission to general acute hospitals for an alcohol-related condition than those living in the least deprived areas (1059 vs 167 per 100,000 population).