Antibiotic-resistant bacteria more prevalent in device-related infections versus surgical infections

  • Weiner-Lastinger LM, et al.
  • US National Healthcare Safety Network
  • 25 Nov 2019

  • curated by Priscilla Lynch
  • Medical News
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Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) related to the use of medical devices are more likely to be antibiotic resistant than HAIs that result from surgical procedures, according to a report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN).

The study, published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, analysed data from central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, ventilator-associated events, and surgical site infections (SSIs) reported from US inpatient healthcare facilities between 2015-2017 among adult patients  (≥18 years).

Overall, 5626 facilities performed adult HAI surveillance during this period, most of which were general acute-care hospitals with

Percentages of pathogens with non-susceptibility (%NS) to selected antimicrobials were calculated for each HAI type, location type, surgical category, and surgical wound closure technique.

Pathogens varied by HAI and location type.

Escherichia coli (18%), Staphylococcus aureus (12%), and Klebsiella spp (9%) were the three most frequently reported pathogens.

The %NS for most pathogens was significantly higher among device-associated HAIs than SSIs. For instance, 48% of tested Staphylococcus aureus isolated from device-associated infections were methicillin resistant (MRSA), compared with 41% among those isolated from SSIs.

In addition, pathogens from long-term acute care hospitals had a significantly higher %NS than those from general hospital wards.