Antireflux treatment is linked to chronic cough relief

  • Takeda N & al.
  • J Asthma
  • 15 Jul 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Antireflux treatment appears to provide significant relief to patients with chronic, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)-associated cough.

Why this matters

  • GERD is a common cause of chronic cough.

Study design

  • Researchers studied patients with suspected GERD-associated cough (n=37; mean age, 53.6±14.9 years; 54% women) based on symptoms including heartburn and absence of rhinitis, sinusitis, or postnasal drip.
  • They used patient questionnaires, laboratory analysis of blood and sputum, pulmonary function tests, and endoscopic assessments both before and after 4 weeks of antireflux treatment with the proton pump inhibitor rabeprazole (Aciphex) 20 mg daily and the prokinetic agent itopride (Ganaton) 50 mg 3 times per day.
  • Funding: Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan.

Key results

  • Patient cough symptoms improved after antireflux treatment (P<.0001 with significant correlation between changes in subjective measures of cough severity and acid reflux symptoms p>
  • Researchers found significant positive correlations in all patients between baseline plasma substance P (SP) and sputum neutrophils levels (r=0.46; P=.048) and between decreases in plasma SP and sputum SP levels (r=0.46; P=.049).

Limitations

  • The study was single-center and observational with a small sample size.