ASM Microbe 2019 — Household water treatment systems may affect gut microbiota


  • Emily Willingham, PhD
  • Conference Reports
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Takeaway

  • Household water treatment systems, such as water filters, might affect the composition of gut microbiota, according to results presented at the ASM Microbe 2019 meeting.

Why this matters

  • The authors focused on householders living in a single Wisconsin county to look at water treatment as a predictor of gut microbiome composition. 

Key results

  • 138/466 used some kind of water treatment system or water filter.
  • Use of either was linked significantly to education (P=.006) and income (P<.001 level and living in a rural area class=""> 
  • Diversity of gut microbes decreased with water treatment in a rural county (P=.010), as did richness (P=.033).
  • Diversity increased with age (P=.008).
  • Representation of several genera (Collinsella, Coprobacillus, Coprococcus, Lactobacillus) and other taxa (e.g., class Clostridia) was significantly different with water treatment (P≤.05).

Study design

  • Adults age 18+ living in Wisconsin and who participated in the 2016 Survey of the Health of Wisconsin and submitted a stool sample.
  • DNA of 16s rRNA was used to identify gut microbes.
  • Funding: Not cited.

Limitations

  • Results confined to a single US area and presented without peer review at a conference.