Aspirin linked to improved survival in bladder and breast cancer


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Findings of a new study published in JAMA Network Open suggest aspirin may improve bladder and breast cancer survival.

The cohort study used data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Participants aged ≥65 years at baseline (1993-2001) or who reached age 65 during follow-up were included.

During the study period, 32,580 incident cancers (5.4% bladder, 14.0% breast, 1.0% oesophageal, 1.2% gastric, 2.7% pancreatic and 2.2% uterine) were reported.

Aspirin use was not associated with the incidence of any of the investigated cancer types among individuals aged ≥65 years.

Multivariable regression analysis demonstrated that aspirin use at least three times/week was associated with increased survival among patients with bladder (HR 0.67; 95% CI 0.51-0.88) and breast (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.59-0.96) cancers but not among those with oesophageal, gastric, pancreatic, or uterine cancer.

A similar association of any aspirin use with bladder (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.58-0.98) and breast (HR 0.79; 95% CI 0.63-0.99) cancer survival was observed.

The results add to the accumulating evidence that aspirin may improve survival for some cancers.

“Although aspirin use may confer a cancer protective effect, it remains necessary to consider the harms, as well as the benefits, of long-term aspirin use", the author's caution.