Aspirin use is linked to reduced risk for gastric, esophageal cancer

  • García Rodríguez LA & al.
  • Int J Cancer
  • 1 May 2020

  • curated by Jim Kling
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Low-dose aspirin use is associated with lower risk for gastric and esophageal cancer, according to a matched analysis with results backing up observational findings.

Why this matters

  • The design of the current study minimized bias and confounding factors, so its results strengthen confidence in observational findings.

Study design

  • Population-based study of UK primary care electronic health records (223,640 aspirin users matched 1:1 with nonusers).
  • Current low-dose (75-300 mg) aspirin use: 0-90 days before the event date for cases, or random for matched control individuals.
  • Funding: Bayer AG.

Key results

  • Low-dose aspirin use was associated with reduced risk for gastric cancer:
    • OR, 0.46 (95% CI, 0.38-0.57).
      • Risk reduction seen even with concomitant use of NSAIDs (OR, 0.27 vs nonuse of both drugs; 95% CI, 0.12-0.58).
  • Low-dose aspirin use was associated with a reduced risk for esophageal cancer:
    • OR, 0.59 (95% CI, 0.51-0.69).
    • Risk reduction seen even with concomitant use of:
      • Clopidogrel (OR, 0.23 vs nonuse of both drugs; 95% CI, 0.10-0.56).
      • NSAIDs (OR, 0.58 vs nonuse of both; 95% CI, 0.36-0.96).
  • Concomitant use of aspirin and a proton pump inhibitor was associated with greater cancer risk:
    • Gastric cancer: OR, 1.94 (95% CI, 1.45-2.60).
    • Esophageal cancer: OR, 3.18; 95% CI, 2.55-3.95).

Limitations

  • Retrospective.