Atopic dermatitis linked to impaired sleep quality throughout childhood

  • Ramirez FD & al.
  • JAMA Pediatr
  • 4 Mar 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Medical News
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is associated with impaired sleep quality but not sleep duration throughout childhood, a new study published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics reports. In addition, increasing disease severity and comorbid asthma or allergic rhinitis appear to be associated with worse sleep-quality outcomes.

Researchers performed this longitudinal cohort study using data (1990-2008) from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, a population-based birth cohort in Avon, United Kingdom. The study sample was limited to children alive at 1 year of age and included repeated measures of self-reported AD and sleep through age 16 years of age (n=13,998; male, 51.6%; median follow-up duration, 11 years). Data analysis was performed from September 2017 to September 2018.

A total of 4938 children (35.3%) met the definition of AD between 2 and 16 years of age. Total sleep duration was similar between children with active AD and those without AD at all ages. Children with active AD were estimated to sleep a mean 2 minutes less per day throughout childhood (95% CI, −4 to 0 minutes). Children with active dermatitis had nearly 50% higher odds of reporting more sleep-quality disturbances throughout childhood (adjusted OR [aOR], 1.48; 95% CI, 1.33-1.66). Worse sleep quality was reported in children with more severe active disease (quite bad or very bad AD: aOR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.42-1.98) and in those with comorbid asthma or allergic rhinitis (aOR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.54-2.09). Children with inactive disease (OR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.28-1.55) and those with active mild disease (OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.27-1.54) had higher odds of reporting more sleep quality.

The authors said: “Our findings suggest that clinicians should consider sleep quality among all children with atopic dermatitis, especially those with comorbid asthma or allergic rhinitis and severe disease; it appears interventions to improve sleep quality are needed for this population.”

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit