Atopic dermatitis tied to higher risk for autoimmune disorders

  • J Am Acad Dermatol

  • curated by Brian Richardson, PhD
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • A cross-sectional study of the National Inpatient Sample suggests that prevalence of autoimmune disease is higher in adults and children with atopic dermatitis (AD).

Why this matters

  • This study suggests a need for increased screening for autoimmune disorders in patients with AD.

Key results

  • AD was associated with higher prevalence of autoimmune disease in adults (7.9% vs 5.7%) and children (2.0% vs 1.0%).
  • In multivariate analysis, AD was associated with higher odds of autoimmune disease in adults (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.32-1.8) and children (OR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.73-2.50).
  • Cutaneous disorders with the largest effect sizes in adults included alopecia areata (AA) (OR, 37.29; 95% CI, 13.96-99.59), vitiligo (OR, 11.47; 95% CI, 6.64-19.80), and chronic urticaria (OR, 9.15; 95% CI, 6.28-13.34).
  • The autoimmune comorbidities with the largest effect sizes in children included AA (OR, 23.58; 95% CI, 7.34-75.76), vitiligo (OR, 9.40; 95% CI, 3.05-28.99), scleroderma (OR, 9.35; 95% CI, 2.97-29.44), and chronic urticaria (OR, 9.40; 95% CI, 3.05-37.61).

Study design

  • 9290 adult patients and 10,196 pediatric patients with AD from the 2002-2012 National Inpatient Sample were analyzed for prevalence of autoimmune disease.
  • Funding: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality; the Dermatology Foundation.

Limitations

  • Cross-sectional study design.

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