ATS 2019—Smartphone app plus pharmacology improves smoking cessation


  • Tara Haelle
  • Conference Reports
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Takeaway

  • Patients seeking to quit smoking and using varenicline or nicotine patch had higher quit rates when using smartphone app CureApp than a sham app.

Why this matters

  • Smoking cessation treatment has low success rates even with pharmacology. 

Study design

  • Phase 3 randomized controlled trial involving 584 adult smokers (74.5% male) intending to quit, from 31 smoking cessation clinics in Japan from October 2017 to January 2018.
  • Participants received varenicline (80%) or nicotine patch (20%) during 12-week standard smoking cessation program with counseling, followed by 24 weeks use of CureApp Smoking Cessation app (CASC) or disabled sham app (control).
    • CureApp included profile-customized animated video tutorials, interactive chatting with automated guidance system, digital diary, and daily exhaled CO measurements with physician access to progress.
    • App was uninstalled after week 24.
  • Funding: CureApp, Inc.

Key results

  • Continuous abstinence rate was higher for CASC (n=285) than control (n=287) group at
    • Weeks 9-12 (75.4% vs 66.2%; OR, 1.86; P=.004). 
    • Week 24 (63.9% vs 50.5%; OR, 1.92; P=.001).
    • Week 52 (52.3% vs 41.5%; P=.01).
  • 7-day point prevalence abstinence was higher for CASC vs control at weeks 4, 8, 12, 24 (72.3% vs 58.2%; P<.001 and vs p>