Blood glucose variability by continuous glucose monitoring in stroke

  • Nukui S & al.
  • J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis
  • 21 Sep 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • This study found that many patients with stroke have blood glucose levels outside the recommended guideline range (140-180 mg/dL) in the acute phase based on continuous glucose monitoring (CGM).

Why this matters

  • Findings suggest that blood glucose levels at admission may be useful for the prediction of hypo-and hyperglycaemic events.

Study design

  • Study of 39 patients (aged ≥20 years old; mean age, 75.9±11.5 years) with acute ischaemic stroke (AIS) admitted within 7 days after onset during 2018.
  • Blood glucose levels monitored every 15 minutes for a 72-hour period.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Hypoglycaemia (180 mg/dL) in 21 patients.
  • The frequency of hypoglycaemia during the 72-hour monitoring period was 10.1±15.7%, and the frequency was higher during night-time in patients with normoglycaemia at admission (P<.001>
  • Hyperglycaemic events were observed at mean frequency of 11.9±22.5%, and the frequency was higher during daytime in patients with hyperglycaemia at admission (P<.001>
  • Logistic regression analyses revealed that only the admission blood glucose level was a significant potential predictor for hypo- and hyperglycaemic events.

Limitations

  • Small sample size.