BMA slams pay rises announced by Government


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • UK Professional News
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The BMA has slammed the latest round of pay awards for senior doctors.

The 47th Report of the Review Body on Doctors’ and Dentists’ Remuneration (DDRB), which was presented to Parliament last week, recommends a 2.5 per cent increase to the national salary scale for salaried consultants and doctors in training, backdated to April 2019.

Given that Specialty Doctors and Associate Specialist (SAS) doctors will have a crucial role in delivering the improvements of the NHS Long-Term Plan, the review board recommended that this group should receive an extra 1 per cent in addition to the 2.5 per cent general increase.

Delivering the Government’s response to the DDRB recommendations, Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Matt Hancock said consultants will receive the 2.5 per cent general uplift, backdated to April 2019. In addition, the value of both national and old style local clinical excellence awards (CEAs) will be frozen.

SAS doctors will receive a 2.5 per cent general uplift, backdated to April 2019. However, an additional 1 per cent will only be added in 2020/21 if contractual reforms are accepted in a multi-year deal.

The Department of Health and Social Care says the pay rises will be worth £1,940 to £2,630 for consultants, £970 to £1,820 for Specialty Doctors, and £1,360 to £2,250 for Associate Specialists.

BMA consultants committee chair Rob Harwood said the pay awards make it is clear that the government has not recognised or rewarded the work and commitment of senior doctors.

He said the pay uplift does not provide any mechanism to address historic underpayments.

“Many senior doctors’ income is being significantly impacted by the punitive pension taxation, so this low pay rise merely adds to the overall position of doctors being undervalued and effectively paying to go to work,” Dr Harwood said.

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