Breast cancer screening for at-risk men shows benefit


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

There is potential benefit in screening men at high risk for developing breast cancer, suggests a new research.

The retrospective study reviewed consecutive male breast imaging examinations over a 12-year period (between 2005-2017).

A total of 1,869 men (age range, 18-96 years) underwent 2,052 examinations yielding 2,304 breast lesions and resulting in 149 (6.5%) biopsies in 133 men. Of these, 41 (27.5%) were malignant and 108 (72.5%) were benign.

Five node-negative cancers resulted from screening mammography, yielding a cancer detection rate of 18 per 1000 examinations, with cancers diagnosed on average after four person-years of screening. The authors remarked that the cancer yield of screening was higher in men than women.

Mammographic screening sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of biopsy were 100 per cent (95% CI 50%-100%), 95.0 per cent (95% CI 93.1%-98%) and 50 per cent (95% CI 22.2%-77.8%), respectively.

Older age (P<.001 ashkenazi descent genetic mutations personal history first-degree family were associated with breast cancer.>

Non-first-degree family history was not associated with cancer (P=.09).

The research is published in the journal, Radiology, the official journal of the Radiological Society of North America.