Breast cancer tied to risk for second primary lung cancer

  • Wang R & al.
  • Front Oncol
  • 1 Jan 2018

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Second primary lung cancer rates are higher in patients with prior breast cancer (BC), with the risk greatest in those with triple-negative BC (TNBC).

Why this matters

  • The extent to which a history of BC increases lung cancer risk was unclear.

Study design

  • 620,429 women from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database diagnosed with BC between 2000 and 2014.
  • Funding: National Natural Science Foundation of China; others.

Key results

  • 6269 cases of second primary lung cancers; 87.3% NSCLC, 12.7% SCLC.
  • Slightly higher rates of second primary lung cancer in patients with BC vs the general female population (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 1.03; 95% CI, 1.00-1.06).
  • Lung cancer risk was highest within 1 year of BC diagnosis (SIR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.23-1.39) and with BC diagnosis at age 20-39 years (SIR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.75-3.23).
  • Patients with TNBC had highest lung cancer risk of all subtypes (SIR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.29-1.94).
  • 63.4% of patient deaths were attributed to lung cancer, with SCLC conveying the highest mortality (72.3%).
  • OS was worse in patients with NSCLC who were negative for estrogen and progesterone receptors, whereas BC characteristics did not influence OS in patients with SCLC.

Limitations

  • Retrospective study with no data on treatment.

Please confirm your acceptance

To gain full access to GPnotebook please confirm:

By submitting here you confirm that you have accepted Terms of Use and Privacy Policy of GPnotebook.

Submit