Bulimia hospitalisation is a risk factor for later CVD hospitalisation

  • Tith RM & al.
  • JAMA Psychiatry
  • 16 Oct 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Women with a history of bulimia nervosa hospitalisation have increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) hospitalisation and death up to 8 years later.

Why this matters

  • Women with this eating disorder might benefit from close management of CVD risk factors over the long term, in addition to managing the known acute risk.

Key results

  • Follow-up totaled 2,957,677 person-years.
  • Women with a bulimia nervosa hospitalisation history had a greater incidence of CVD vs women with pregnancy-related hospitalisation: 10.34 (95% CI, 7.77-13.76) vs 1.02 (95% CI, 0.99-1.06) per 1000 person-years.
  • Having 3 or more admissions for bulimia was linked to greater long-term CVD incidence: 25.13 (95% CI, 13.52-46.70) per 1000 person-years.
  • Compared with pregnancy-related hospitalization, with bulimia nervosa hospitalisation:
    • CVD risk was 4.25-fold greater (95% CI, 2.98-6.07).
    • Death risk was 4.72-fold greater (95% CI, 2.05-10.84).
  • Bulimia nervosa hospitalisation was associated with increased risk for all CVDs examined.

Study design

  • Longitudinal cohort study, Canada; 416,709 women (818 with bulimia nervosa hospitalisation; 415,891 with pregnancy-related event hospitalisation).
  • Funding: Heart & Stroke Foundation of Canada; others.

Limitations

  • Misclassification possible.
  • Does not include analyses of binge-eating disorder.