Cardiorespiratory fitness protects against lung cancer in former smokers

  • Vainshelboim B & al.
  • Am J Prev Med
  • 27 Sep 2019

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) appears to exert a protective effect against lung cancer in former male smokers.
  • Data also point to lower reduced disease-related mortality and longer survival in current male smokers with lung cancer.

Why this matters

  • CRF appears to be a modifiable risk factor for lung cancer morbidity and mortality.

Study design

  • 1602 former and 1377 current male smokers from the Veterans Exercise Testing Study underwent CRF assessment.
  • Mean age, 59.1 years; median follow-up, 11.6 years.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Lung cancer was diagnosed in 99 patients (2.9% of former smokers and 3.8% of current smokers).
  • In former smokers, lung cancer incidence was significantly lower in patients with moderate CRF (HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25-0.97) or high CRF (HR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.08-0.66; Ptrend=.015).
  • In current smokers, moderate and high CRF was associated with:
    • Lower lung cancer mortality (HR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.06-0.4 and HR, 0.15; 95% CI, 0.05-0.5, respectively; Ptrend<.001>
    • Longer survival time (HR, 10.8; 95% CI, 8.2-13.4 and HR, 12.2; 95% CI, 7.9-16.5, respectively; Ptrend<.001>

Limitations

  • All-male study.
  • Observational design.

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