CDC reports that HIV prevention efforts have stalled

  • CDC
  • CDC
  • 4 Mar 2019

  • curated by Liz Scherer
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • CDC noted that the dramatic decline in annual HIV infections has stalled, and rate of new infections has stabilized.
  • Declines in new infections have plateaued because effective HIV prevention/treatment is not reaching disproportionately affected groups and persons at especially high risk, including those residing in the rural South, African-Americans, and Latinos.
  • Recent modeling study challenges ability to achieve national goals with current interventions.

Why this matters

  • Identify/diagnose HIV as early as possible following acquisition.
  • Engage infected individuals in treatment to quickly achieve viral suppression.
  • Encourage preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) uptake to prevent new infections.
  • Devise strategies to respond quickly to growing HIV clusters to prevent transmission.

Key points

  • HIV incidence remained stable in 2016 compared with previous years, with distinct subgroup differences.
  • Gay/bisexual men who have sex with men (MSM) still accounted for highest proportion (68.2%) of new infections; incidence stabilized in black MSM, increased 30% in Latino MSM, and declined 10% in white MSM.
  • Increases were notable among black/Latino gay/bisexual men ages 25-34 years (~65%).
  • Declines seen (~17%) among heterosexual men/women combined, including a 15% decrease in African-American women.
  • Rates stabilized in drug injectors.
  • By region/area of residence, declines were seen in D.C. and NY, remained highest in the South (rate: 19.5).

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