CDC study finds Southern black MSM are not consistently tested for HIV nor linked to care

  • Marano M & al.
  • MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep
  • 20 Jul 2018

  • curated by Liz Scherer
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • In 20 Southern US jurisdictions, black men who have sex with men (MSM) accounted for 36% of new HIV diagnoses in non-health-care facilities but received only 6% of HIV tests.

Why this matters

  • Black MSM are disproportionately affected by HIV but are not routinely receiving testing nor linkage to care.
  • Targeted risk-based testing, screening in non-health-care settings, and health clinics may help reduce transmission to unsuspecting partners.

Key results

  • 374,871 CDC-funded tests provided in 2016.
  • 6% (22,183) were provided to black MSM, who accounted for 36% (828/2034) of all new HIV diagnoses.
  • 43% of tests provided to black MSM men aged 24-34 years residing in metropolitan areas.
  • New HIV diagnoses were highest in those aged 20-24 years (4.8%) followed by 13-19 years (4.1%), 25-34 years (4.0%).
  • 67% (552) newly diagnosed were linked to care in 90 days, 55% (451) linked to partner services.
  • Adjusted prevalence ratio (1.36) for care linkage was higher for urban (70%) vs metropolitan dwellers (52%).

Study design

  • Retrospective analysis of CDC-funded HIV testing, care linkage, in 20 health departments, 24 community-based organizations among black MSM residing in the Southern United States.
  • Funding: CDC.

Limitations

  • Nongeneralizable.
  • Care linkage rates underestimated.
  • Overestimated new positive infections.
  • Findings based on non-health-care facilities data.

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