Cerebral venous thrombosis: anaemia at admission tied to poor clinical outcomes

  • Silvis SM & al.
  • Eur J Neurol
  • 27 Dec 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Admission anaemia was an independent predictor of poor clinical outcome in patients with cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT).

Why this matters

  • Findings warrant further studies to determine whether a causal relationship underlies this association and whether increasing haemoglobin levels improves clinical outcome.

Study design

  • Study evaluated the association between anaemia and poor clinical outcomes in 952 patients with CVT.
  • Definition of anaemia was made according to World Health Organization criteria.
  • Poor clinical outcomes (modified Rankin Scale [mRS] score, 3-6), mortality and mRS 0-1 were evaluated.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • Of 874 patients with CVT, 22% had anaemia at admission.
  • Compared with patients without anaemia, those with anaemia more often had:
    • history of cancer (17% vs 7%; P<.001>
    • reported coma (11% vs 5%; P=.001) and
    • non-haemorrhagic parenchymal lesions (44% vs 30%; P<.001>
  • Poor clinical outcome (21% vs 11%; P<.001 and mortality vs p=".07)" were frequently reported in patients with anaemia.>
  • After adjusting potential confounders, patients with anaemia at admission were at an increased risk for poor outcome (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.2) and mortality (OR, 1.4; 95% CI, 0.7-2.9).

Limitations

  • Exclusion 8% patients with CVT because of missing baseline haemoglobin data.
  • Retrospective design.