Checkpoint inhibitor efficacy better in NSCLC patients with high BMI

  • Lung Cancer

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • High BMI was associated with better survival in patients with NSCLC treated with second- or later-line immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs).

Why this matters

  • Prior studies suggested BMI was associated with the efficacy of ICIs in solid tumors such as melanomas, but its link to ICI efficacy in patients with NSCLC was unclear.

Study design

  • 84 patients with NSCLC with programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression ≥50% were treated with pembrolizumab as first-line therapy (cohort 1), and 429 patients with NSCLC who received nivolumab/pembrolizumab/atezolizumab as second- or later-line treatment (cohort 2).
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Key results

  • BMI was not associated with survival in cohort 1.
  • Patients in cohort 2 with high BMI had significantly better PFS (3.7 vs 2.8 months; P=.036) and OS (15.4 vs 13.5 months; P=.021) than those with low BMI.
  • Patients with high BMI and PD-L1 ≥50% had significantly better PFS (17.0 vs 3.5 months; P=.007) and OS (not reached vs 16.1 months; P=.031) than patients with low BMI and/or PD-L1
  • Patients with PD-L1 ≥50% had significantly better PFS (9.4 vs 2.8 months; P<.001 and os vs months p=".013)" than those with pd-l1>

Limitations

  • Retrospective study.