Chemo-induced cognitive deficits greatest in younger breast cancer patients

  • Xu Z & al.
  • Cancer Chemother Pharmacol
  • 19 Nov 2019

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • A study using an objective measure of cognitive impairment, namely event-related potentials (ERPs), shows that chemotherapy-associated cognitive impairments are long-lasting and are worst among patients aged

Why this matters

  • This is the largest study to date using objective measures of cognitive impairment and the first to show age-related effects.

Study design

  • Cross-sectional cohort of 529 breast cancer patients (under study for P300 latency in ERPs) was divided into 3 groups: Group 1 was initially diagnosed breast cancer patients before chemotherapy; Group 2 was breast cancer patients during chemotherapy; Group 3 was breast cancer patients at a mean follow-up of 2.42 years postchemotherapy.
  • Prolongation of P300 latency is indicative of cognitive impairment.
  • Funding: National Natural Science Foundation of China.

Key results

  • Groups 2 and 3 had significantly longer P300 latencies than Group 1 (each P<.001 but no difference between groups and>
  • Group 1: 355.13±19.47 ms.
  • Group 2: 364.74±15.73 ms.
  • Group 3: 364.02±17.12 ms.
  • Subgroup analysis finds that prolonged P300 latency persists only in patients aged
  • Subgroup analysis finds no prolonged P300 latency in patients aged ≥60 years (comparing same groups).
  • No significant differences between groups in P300 amplitude.
  • Limitations

    • Observational, cross-sectional design.