Childhood BMI linked to risk of bladder cancer


  • Dawn O'Shea
  • Univadis Medical News
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Adults who were overweight in childhood may be at greater risk of developing bladder cancer (BC), according to new findings.

In the first study of its kind, anthropometric information from 315,763 individuals born between 1930 and 1989 in the Copenhagen School Health Records Register was linked to national registers.

A total of 1,145 individuals were diagnosed with BC. Sex differences were not detected but childhood BMI had positive associations and height had inverse associations with BC. At age 13, the hazard ratio [HR] was 1.10 (95% CI 1.02-1.18) per BMI z-score. HR was 0.94 (95% CI 0.89-1.00) per height z-score.

A pattern of above-average increases in BMI from age seven to 13 years had higher risk of BC than average increases. Above-average growth in height was not significantly associated with BC.

Compared with birth weights of 3.5 kg, low (2.5 kg) and high (4.5 kg) birth weights were associated with increased risk of BC (HR 1.26; 95% CI 1.01-1.58, and HR 1.36; 95% CI 1.09-1.70, respectively).

Presenting the findings in Annals of Human Biology, the authors concluded that high BMI, short stature, excess BMI gain in childhood, and low and high birth weights, are associated with increased risk of BC.