Childhood exposure to secondhand smoke ups risk for adult Afib

  • J Am Coll Cardiol

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Secondhand smoke exposure in childhood is linked to increased risk for adult Afib.
  • Some of these childhood-exposed adults also smoke, which may be a factor, but analyses were adjusted for family clusters and common Afib risk factors.

Why this matters

  • Editorial: these findings should remind clinicians to ask about tobacco use, emphasise to parents the need to avoid exposing their children, and offer cessation interventions where warranted at every visit.

Key results

  • 14.3% of offspring cohort developed Afib during the median 40.5 (interquartile range, 33.3-41.9) years of follow-up.
  • Overall incidence: 4.02 per 1000 person-years.
  • With each pack-day increase in parental smoking, Afib incidence among exposed children is increased by 18% (adjusted HR, 1.18; P=.04).
  • These children also were more likely themselves to smoke (aOR, 1.34; P<.001 which contributed in part ci to the afib risk.>
  • Smoking in the offspring cohort raised Afib risk by 32% (adjusted HR, 1.32; P=.002).

Study design

  • Study of data from Framingham Offspring cohort (n=2816) and their parents in the original Framingham Heart Study cohort.
  • Funding: University of California; American Heart Association; NIH; others.

Limitations

  • For 45% of the offspring cohort, parental smoking status was not available, so their data were not included.