Childhood fracture tied to higher risk for subsequent fractures

  • Escott BG & al.
  • Pediatrics
  • 15 Jul 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • A fracture in childhood is associated with increased risk for future fractures compared with children who never experienced a break.

Why this matters

  • Childhood fracture rates are on the rise.
  • Secondary prevention measures to promote bone health might be considered in some children, especially those with multiple fracture history or multiple risk factors.

Key results

  • Children who had a fracture at baseline had 60% increased rate of later fractures: adjusted incidence rate ratio, 1.60 (95% CI, 1.46-1.75; P<.0001>
  • 23.0% of children who had a fracture at baseline had 1 or more fractures in the 7 subsequent years, compared with 11.3% of children with no initial fracture.
  • Boys were more prone than girls to later fractures after an initial event, with the difference peaking at about age 12 years.

Study design

  • Population-based, retrospective database study covering about 2.5 million healthy children aged 0-15 years living in Ontario, Canada, from April 2003 to March 2004, followed for 7 years.
  • Funding: None disclosed.

Limitations

  • Not a complete birth cohort.
  • Database limitations apply, including the possibility of coding variations.