Children with atopic dermatitis may be at higher risk for vitamin D deficiency

  • Hattangdi-Haridas SR & al.
  • Nutrients
  • 9 Aug 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • This study found significantly lower serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels in patients with atopic dermatitis (AD), especially in children.
  • Vitamin D supplementations with a weighted average dose of 1500-1600 IU/daily for up to 3 months showed significant reduction in AD severity.

Why this matters

  • The incidence of AD is growing worldwide, especially in urbanised countries.
  • Findings warrant monitoring of vitamin D levels in patients with AD, especially in children.

Study design

  • Mata-analysis included 16 studies (observational and interventional) after a search across MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases.
  • Primary outcomes: changes in serum 25(OH)D levels (observational) and Scoring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD) index or Eczema Area and Severity Index score (interventional) in the vitamin D supplementation vs control group.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Overall serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly lower in patients with AD vs control group (mean difference [MD], −14 [95% CI, −25 to −2] nmol/L; P=.02; I2, 99%).
  • A sub-analysis of paediatric population showed a significantly lower serum 25(OH)D level in children with AD vs control group (MD, −16 [95% CI, −31 to −1] nmol/L; P=.05; I2, 99%).
  • Vitamin D supplementation group with a weighted average dose of 1500 IU/daily (MD, −21 [95% CI, −27 to −15] points) and 1600 IU/daily (MD, −11 [95% CI, −13 to −9] points; P<.0001 for both showed significant reduction in scorad score vs control group.>

Limitations

  • Study included mild and moderate AD with only a few severe cases.
  • No data from infants (age,