Cholecystectomy tied to 22% increased risk for colorectal cancer

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Takeaway

  • Cholecystectomy is tied to an increased risk for colorectal cancer (CRC), particularly in the United States and Western countries.

Why this matters

  • Cholecystectomy is the standard treatment for gallbladder diseases, and previous studies on the link between cholecystectomy and CRC yielded conflicting results.

Study design

  • Meta-analysis of 10 cohort studies involving 524,649 patients.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • History of cholecystectomy increased the risk for CRC (Risk ratio [RR], 1.22; 95% CI, 1.08-1.38).
  • Subgroup analysis found prior cholecystectomy increased the risk for colon cancer (RR, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.07-1.58) and ascending colon cancer (RR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.01-1.26), but not rectal cancer (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.89-1.34).
  • A subgroup analysis of study regions found that prior cholecystectomy increased the risk for CRC in Western countries (RR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.05-1.36) and United States (RR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.12-1.45), but not in Europe (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.98-1.38).

Limitations

  • Low number of accepted studies and some studies had incomplete data.
  • 2 of the 10 studies were considered low-quality.