Chronic pain after lung resection: what are the numbers?

  • Yoon S & al.
  • Reg Anesth Pain Med
  • 17 Mar 2020

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • About 17% of patients with lung cancer who underwent surgical resection developed chronic postsurgical pain (CPSP) within 36 months of surgery, and more than one-third of this group are prescribed strong opioids for pain.

Why this matters

  • Few data address the incidence of long-term delayed or recurrent CPSP, which can contribute to functional disability, poor QoL, and chronic opioid use.

Study design

  • 3200 patients underwent thoracic surgery for lung cancer.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • 17.4% were diagnosed with CPSP within 36 months of surgery.
  • New CPSP diagnoses in 14.3% at 3 months after surgery and 3.1% at ≥6 months.
  • Incidence of CPSP decreased during the study period.
  • 85.1% with CPSP received analgesics, 36.9% of whom received strong opioids, and 17.0% of whom received strong opioids for >90 days after surgery.
  • Independent predictors (HRs) of CPSP within 36 months of surgery included:
    • Female sex: 1.20 (P=.05).
    • Longer surgery duration: 1.11 (P<.01>
    • Postoperative chemotherapy: 1.55 (P<.001>
    • Postoperative radiation therapy: 1.35 (P=.02).

Limitations

  • Retrospective, single-center study.