Chronic rhinosinusitis tied to depression, anxiety

  • Kim JY & al.
  • JAMA Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
  • 7 Feb 2019

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • Overall incidence of depression and anxiety was higher in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), especially those with nasal polyps, than in those without the condition, according to a large population study in South Korea.

Why this matters

  • Study findings can help clinicians monitor patients with CRS for signs of depression and anxiety, possibly preventing mental health issues or treating them early.

Study design

  • This retrospective study propensity matched 16,224 patients with CRS (CRS without nasal polyp [CRSsNP], n=10,763; CRS with nasal polyp [CRSwNP], n=5461) and 32,448 patients without CRS.
  • Funding: Korea Health Industry Development Institute.

Key results

  • During 11-years of follow-up, the overall incidence of depression (aHR, 1.54; 95% CI, 1.48-1.61) and anxiety (aHR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.52-1.62) was significantly higher in the group with vs without CRS.
  • Likelihood for developing depression and anxiety was higher in the CRSsNP vs the CRSwNP group:
    • CRSsNP: aHRdepression, 1.61 (95% CI, 1.54-1.69); aHRanxiety, 1.63 (95% CI, 1.57-1.69).
    • CRSwNP: aHRdepression, 1.41 (95% CI, 1.32-1.50); aHRanxiety, 1.45 (95% CI, 1.38-1.52).

Limitations

  • Potential confounding factors not adjusted for.
  • CRS diagnosis dependent on Korean Classification of Diseases diagnostic codes.

Coauthored with Antara Ghosh, PhD