Clinical vertebral fracture increases risk for cardiopulmonary diseases

  • Lee FY & al.
  • BMJ Open
  • 21 Nov 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Clinical vertebral fractures (CVFs) are associated with increases in subsequent risk of arotic dissection (AD), congestive heart failure (CHF), pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), according to a nationwide cohort from Taiwan.

Why this matters

  • This is the first longitudinal cohort to analyse the association between CVF and cardiopulmonary diseases.

Study design

  • Retrospective cohort of patients aged ≥18 years with a diagnosis of CVF (n=108,935) or no-CVF (n=108,935) matched on age, sex, index year, and comorbidities in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database.
  • Both groups were followed for 1 year of the incidence of cardiopulmonary diseases.
  • Funding: Taiwan Ministry of Health; others.

Key results

  • CVFs were associated with:
    • 23% increase in AD (4.85 vs 3.99 per 10,000 person-years in the CVF group vs no-CVF group, respectively; the adjusted HR was 1.23; 95% CI, 1.03-1.45).
    • 35% increase in CHF (119.1 vs 89.6 per 10,000 person-years; the adjusted HR was 1.35; 95% CI, 1.30-1.40).
    • 57% increase in pneumonia (283.3 vs 183.5 per 10,000 person-years; the adjusted HR was 1.57; 95% CI, 1.54-1.61).
    • 2-fold increase in ARDS (9.18 vs 4.18 per 10,000 person-years; the adjusted HR was 2.21; 95% CI, 1.91-2.57).

Limitations

  • Retrospective observational design.
  • Findings may not generalise to non-Asians.

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