Community-based lung health check encourages smokers to quit

  • Lung Cancer

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • More than half of smokers who quit smoking after undergoing a lung health check at a community-based lung cancer screening (LCS) program located in an underserved area cited the program as the reason for quitting.

Why this matters

  • Incorporating smoking cessation in LCS and offering lung health checks in traditionally underserved areas could increase the odds smokers may quit.

Study design

  • 919 ever-smokers aged 55-74 years underwent a lung health check, including brief smoking cessation advice and lung cancer risk assessment.
  • 1-year follow-up.
  • Funding: Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust.

Key results

  • Mean smoking duration was 43.3 years (51 pack-years).
  • 50.3% were current smokers.
  • At 1 year, 10.2% of current smokers had stopped smoking for ≥4 weeks, 79% of whom had quit for >6 months.
  • After multivariable adjustment, quitting smoking was associated with having baseline respiratory symptoms (aOR, 2.62; P=.035).
  • 5.3% of former smokers at baseline relapsed.
  • Among current smokers, the lung health check made 44% consider stopping, 29% try to quit, 25% smoke less, and 10% look for help to stop.
  • 55% of those who quit between baseline and the first CT scan cited the program as the reason.

Limitations

  • Smoking status was self-reported.