Contaminated urine samples more likely from women with high BMIs

  • Am J Emerg Med
  • 17 May 2019

  • International Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Women with higher BMIs are more likely to provide contaminated urine samples.

Why this matters

  • This finding affirms recommendations to catheterize obese women for urine sample collection.

Study design

  • Researchers studied women providing clean catch, midstream urine samples during treatment at an inner-city emergency department (N=350; mean age, 53.7±19.1 years; mean BMI, 31.5±9.8 kg/m2; 22% with overweight, 35% with obesity, 17% with morbid obesity).
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • 60% of patients provided contaminated samples.
  • Mean BMIs were significantly different in patients who provided contaminated samples (32.7±10.2 kg/m2) vs clean samples (29.7±8.8 kg/m2; P<.01>
  • Multiple variable logistic regression showed obese and morbidly obese patients were more likely to provide contaminated samples, with no significant associations with other variables except for hypertension (OR, 1.85; P=.02).

Limitations

  • Hospital laboratory processes may have lead to underestimation of the overall sample contamination rate.