Cost-effectiveness of long-acting insulin


  • Heather Mason
  • Univadis Medical News
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This short-term analysis demonstrates that degludec is a cost-effective treatment option relative to glargine U300, in the Netherlands, according to a study in Advances in Therapy.

An analysis from the COmpariNg the EffiCacy and Safety of Insulin DegLUDEc and Insulin Glargine 300 Units/mL in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Inadequately Treated with Basal Insulin and Oral Antidiabetic Drugs (CONCLUDE) trial, evaluated the short-term cost-effectiveness of these highly relevant comparators to inform decision-making in the Dutch healthcare system.

Treatment with degludec was associated with mean annual cost savings (€24.71 per patient) compared to glargine U300 due to its lower basal insulin dose and lower severe hypoglycaemia rate. Lower rates of non-severe nocturnal and severe hypoglycaemia resulted in improved effectiveness (+0.0045 quality-adjusted life years [QALYs] with degludec relative to glargine U300).

The overall cost-effectiveness of degludec was insensitive to variations in most model parameters, and it was the dominant treatment option in 13 of the 15 one-way deterministic sensitivity analyses.

The authors conclude that their analysis shows that degludec is a cost-effective treatment option relative to glargine U300, and it could be an efficient use of Dutch public healthcare resources in insulin-experienced patients with type 2 diabetes.