CRC diagnoses trend younger in the U.S.

  • Virostko J & al.
  • Cancer
  • 22 Jul 2019

  • curated by Jim Kling
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

Takeaway

  • Between 2004 and 2015, there was an increase in the proportion of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer (CRC) who were below age 50 years, and they were more likely to have advanced disease.

Why this matters

  • Trend matches that seen in an analysis of the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, and could inform discussions about recommendations for earlier CRC screening.

Study design

  • Retrospective analysis of the National Cancer Database registry (n=1,185,763).
  • Funding: NCI, Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.

Key results

  • 89% of cases were diagnosed at age 50 years or older and 11% at 50 years or younger.
  • In younger subjects:
    • Primary rectal cancer was more common (40.0% vs 28.5%; P<.0001>
    • Diagnosis was more likely to be stage III or IV (51.6% vs 40.0%).
    • Proportion of all CRC diagnoses increased from 10.0% in 2004 to 12.2% in 2015.
  • Mean age at diagnosis declined by 0.21 (95% CI, 0.18-0.24) years annually for rectal cancer and 0.19 (95% CI, 0.16-0.22) years annually for colon cancer.
  • The increasing proportion of diagnoses at a younger age was seen in Hispanic whites (P<.05 and non-hispanic whites but not in african americans or asians.>

Limitations

  • Retrospective analysis.