CRC: postsurgical aspirin associated with survival benefit

  • Sung J & al.
  • J Gastroenterol Hepatol
  • 4 Dec 2018

  • curated by Jim Kling
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • A 10-year follow-up study shows that low-dose aspirin is associated with better colorectal cancer (CRC)-related survival and OS after surgery, regardless of whether or not aspirin was given before surgery.

Why this matters

  • The chemopreventive effect of aspirin is well-known, but less is known about its potential benefit after CRC diagnosis and surgery.
  • A previous study found that aspirin had a greater effect on CRC survival than CRC incidence, suggesting it may benefit patients even after diagnosis.

Study design

  • Retrospective analysis of CRC patients diagnosed at any public hospital in Hong Kong from 2000 to 2004 (n=3292).
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • 3292 of 13,528 patients took aspirin regularly after surgery.
  • Compared with those who stopped aspirin use after surgery, continued aspirin use postsurgery was associated with a reduced risk for CRC mortality (subdistribution HR [SHR], 0.70; 95% CI, 0.60-0.82) and all-cause mortality (SHR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.56-0.69).
  • Compared with never-users, patients with no aspirin use prediagnosis but who started aspirin use after surgery had lower CRC mortality (SHR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.78-0.96) and all-cause mortality (SHR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.83-0.96).

Limitations

  • Retrospective study.
  • Chinese population.
  • COX-2 expression was unknown.

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