Daily coffee intake is tied to breast cancer risk

  • Sánchez-Quesada C & al.
  • Eur J Nutr
  • 18 Jan 2020

  • curated by Miriam Davis, PhD
  • Univadis Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • More than 1 cup of coffee/day (vs ≤1 cup/day) is tied to reduced risk for breast cancer in postmenopausal but not premenopausal women, according to results of the Spanish SUN prospective cohort study.

Why this matters

  • Results should be reassuring to coffee drinkers, but warrant replication in a controlled trial.

Study design

  • Prospective cohort study (N=10,812) of women without breast cancer at entry.
  • Coffee consumption was assessed by the 136-item food-frequency questionnaire.
  • The breast cancer diagnosis was self-reported, but had to be confirmed by medical record review.
  • Funding: Spanish Government-Instituto de Salud Carlos III; others.

Key results

  • Follow-up: 115,802 person-years and a median of 11.8 years.
  • >1 cup/day (vs ≤1 cup/day) was associated with a 56% decreased risk for breast cancer in postmenopausal women: adjusted HR, 0.44 (95% CI, 0.21-0.92; adjusted for family history of breast cancer, smoking status, smoking pack years, physical activity, alcohol intake, etc.).
  • >1 cup/day (vs ≤1 cup/day) was not associated with a decreased risk for breast cancer in premenopausal women: adjusted HR, 1.69 (95% CI, 0.96-2.96).

Limitations

  • Observational design.