DDW 2019—Parkinson’s more common after appendectomy


  • Sean Henahan
  • Conference Reports
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Takeaway

  • Appendectomy triples the risk of getting Parkinson's disease.

Why this matters

  • The potential link between appendectomy and Parkinson’s has been debated for some time. This is the first large-scale epidemiological study examining that question. It should encourage more research in the area of enteric neurons and disease.

Study design

  • The link between Parkinson’s disease and appendectomy was evaluated via a large commercial database containing more than 68 million health records.
  • The study established a washout period of 6 months between the appendectomy and the development of Parkinson’s disease.

Key results

  • The search found 488,190 patients who underwent appendectomies. Of these, 4470 developed Parkinson’s disease.
  • The overall relative risk of developing Parkinson’s disease was 3.19 in patients after appendectomies vs those who did not undergo appendectomy.
  • All age groups had an increased risk of developing Parkinson’s disease.
  • Caucasians, African Americans, and Asians were at an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease after appendectomies.

Limitations

  • While a washout period was conducted, the time between the appendectomy and the development of Parkinson's disease cannot be determined from the database.

 

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