Dementia is the biggest killer in ≥75-yr-olds in England

  • Public Health England
  • 14 Jun 2019

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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New figures from Public Health England (PHE) indicate that individuals aged ≥75 years account for two-thirds of the total annual deaths in England.

The statistics provide information on mortality in individuals aged ≥75 years in England for 2017. They show that, along with rising life expectancy, the proportion of individuals aged ≥75 years is increasing, and the number of deaths in this age group is also rapidly growing.

The other key findings in the report include:

  • Two-thirds of deaths in the ≥75 age group occurred in individuals aged ≥90 years.
  • Dementia was the leading cause of mortality, responsible for a quarter of deaths.
  • There has been a rise in mortality associated with cancer or liver disease since 2007; however, the rates of mortality associated with chronic heart disease and stroke have dropped.
  • Single, widowed or divorced individuals were more likely to pass away in care homes than those who were married or in a civil partnership.
  • Compared with individuals from areas of lower deprivation, those from areas of higher deprivation were more likely to die younger; more likely to die in hospital; and less likely to die in their homes, hospices and care homes.

The ageing population of England is expected to have serious implications for the provision of end of life care. In the years to come, the NHS hopes to personalise and improve end of life care as a part of its 'Long Term Plan'.

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