Dementia prevalence on rise in England, says a new study

  • Pujades-Rodriguez M & al.
  • PLoS ONE
  • 1 Jan 2018

  • from Antara Ghosh
  • UK Medical News
Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals. Access to the full content of this site is available only to registered healthcare professionals.

A recent study, published in the journal PLoS One, reports marked increase in prevalence of dementia in England between 2000 and 2010. Patients with dementia had higher risk for mortality than those without, and the lifetime risk for dementia at age 65 years was higher in women vs men.

Study evaluated adults (aged ≥18 years) linked in Clinical Practice Research Datalink and primary care, hospital, disease registry and mortality records in England. 47,386 people with dementia were matched to control patients without dementia. The lifetime risk, prevalence and mortality rates in people with and without dementia were evaluated.

The population prevalence of dementia increased markedly from 0.3% in 2000 to 0.7% in 2010, in both men and women. Lifetime dementia risk at age 65 was 9.2% (95% CI, 9.0%-9.4%) in men and 14.9% (95% CI, 14.7%-15.1%) in women. Mortality rate was higher in people with vs without dementia (incidence rate ratio, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.54-1.58). People with dementia more likely to live in deprived area (conditional OR [cOR], 1.26; 95% CI, 1.20-1.31) have documented memory impairment (cOR, 11.97; 95% CI, 11.24-12.75), falls (cOR, 2.36; 95% CI, 2.31-2.41), depression (cOR, 2.03; 95% CI, 1.98-2.09) and anxiety (cOR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.23-1.32).

Authors highlight the importance of using multiple linked data sources for defining dementia in electronic health records. They further comment: “Calculated lifetime risk for dementia from these electronic health records is similar to population-based estimates.”