Diabetes can up the risk for occupational injury

  • Diabet. Med

  • from Sarfaroj Khan
  • Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • Diabetes increases the risk for workplace and commuting injuries in women, and insulin-treated diabetes increases the risk for commuting injury in men.
  • The growing incidence of diabetes translates to a substantial increase in the population-attributable risk and also the cost.

Why this matters

  • Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed in midlife and is very common in the working population.
  • Hypoglycaemia and other complications associated with diabetes are the major cause of injuries.
  • Diabetes is likely to impair bone quality, increasing the risk for fall-related injuries.

Study design

  • This cohort study evaluated 6254 participants (participants with diabetes, n=1020; control participants, n=5234) from inception until 2011.
  • Relationship between diabetes and workplace injuries was analysed.
  • Funding: Finnish Work Environment Foundation and others.

Key results

  • 252 participants with diabetes and 1051 control participants experienced occupational injury.
  • Women with diabetes had higher risk for workplace injury (HR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.11-1.69) and commuting injury (HR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.03-1.79) vs men.
  • Women with diabetes also had higher risk for bone fractures (HR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.62-4.16) and dislocations, sprains and strains (HR, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.07-1.85).
  • Men had a higher risk for commuting injury when receiving insulin for diabetes (HR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.52-6.49).

Limitations

  • Minor injuries were not reported.