Diabetes drug could be repurposed to prevent recurrent miscarriages

  • EBioMedicine
  • 9 Jan 2020

  • curated by Pavankumar Kamat
  • UK Medical News
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According to a new research, the antidiabetic medication sitagliptin could be used to prevent recurrent miscarriages by increasing the amount of stem cells in the lining of the womb, thereby making the womb more viable to support pregnancy.

Researchers at the Warwick Medical School conducted a pilot clinical trial which included 38 women aged 18-42 years who had experienced an average of five miscarriages. The women received treatment with either oral sitagliptin or a placebo for three menstrual cycles. Biopsies of the womb were collected at the start of the treatment and afterwards to assess the number of stem cells.

The findings published in the journal EBioMedicine showed an average of 68 per cent increase in stem cell count among women treated with sitagliptin compared with no significant increase in the control group. Additionally, there was a 50 per cent reduction in the number of ‘stressed’ cells in the lining of the womb. Side effects in the participants were minimal.

Professor Jan Brosens from the Warwick Medical School said: "There are currently very few effective treatments for miscarriage and this is the first that aims at normalising the womb before pregnancy. We hope that this new treatment will prevent such losses and reduce both the physical and psychological burden of recurrent miscarriage."