Dietary magnesium tied to lower risk for depression in women

  • J Affect Disord

  • curated by Kelli Whitlock Burton
  • Clinical Essentials
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Takeaway

  • High levels of dietary magnesium intake were associated with a reduced risk for depression vs lower levels, even after adjusting for potential confounders, but the decrease was significant only in women.

Why this matters

  • This is the first study to examine the dose-response relationship between dietary magnesium and depression risk.

Study design

  • The association between dietary magnesium intake and risk for depression was evaluated in this study (n=17,730).
  • Data were used from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2014).
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • High levels of dietary magnesium intake were inversely associated with risk for depression (P-trend <.001 style="list-style-type:circle;">
  • crude: OR, 0.33 (95% CI, 0.26-0.42); and
  • adjusted: OR, 0.47 (95% CI, 0.34-0.66).
  • Subgroup analysis showed an inverse association between high levels of dietary magnesium intake and risk for depression in women, but not in men (P-trend <.001 style="list-style-type:circle;">
  •  OR, 0.42 (95% CI, 0.27-0.67).
  • Dose-response analysis revealed a linear relationship between dietary magnesium intake and depression (overall, Pfor nonlinearity, 0.34; women, Pfor nonlinearity, 0.30).
  • Limitations

    • Cross-sectional study design.

    Coauthored with Chitra Ravi, MPharm

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