Disease burden from TB falling, but not fast enough, says WHO


  • Mary Corcoran
  • Univadis Medical News
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A new report from the World Health Organization (WHO) has found that while fewer people developed and died from tuberculosis (TB) last year, it remains one of the world’s deadliest infectious diseases.

The WHO’s 2018 Global TB Report shows that in 2017, approximately 10 million people developed TB. There were 1.6 million deaths as a result of TB including among 300,000 HIV-positive people. 

In the region of 558,000 people were estimated to have developed disease resistant to at least rifampicin. Globally, 160,684 cases of multidrug-resistant TB or rifampicin-resistant TB (MDR/RR-TB) were detected and notified, a small increase from the previous year. 

The publication of the report comes just days ahead of the first-ever United Nations High-level Meeting on TB. It urges political leaders attending the event to take decisive action to help meet the global target of ending TB by 2030. 

“We must make sure that this report and the commitments we hear next week from country leaders at the High-Level Meeting on TB translate into action,” said Dr Eric Goosby, UN Special Envoy on TB. “Equally important, we must ensure that we hold our leaders accountable for the actions they promise to take. And we must hold ourselves accountable for keeping the pressure on.”

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