Does alcohol consumption lower risk for Parkinson’s disease?

  • Kim IY & al.
  • Mov Disord
  • 26 Nov 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • Prospective analysis of the Million Women Study, UK, found that alcohol intake does not materially influence the risks for Parkinson’s disease (PD) in women.
  • The study found little evidence between usual alcohol intake and risks for PD and no evidence for an association between intake of specific types of beverages and risks for PD.

Why this matters

  • Previous studies have suggested a differential effect on PD based on the type of alcoholic beverage.

Study design

  • Prospective study of women with a history of PD or secondary parkinsonism (mean age, 50-64 years; n=1,309,267); data from the Million Women Study, UK (1996-2001).
  • Average follow-up period: 17.9 years.
  • Funding: Medical Research Council UK; others.

Key results

  • 11,009 incident primary PD cases were identified; of which, 108 cases were identified through death records and 10,901 cases through hospital records.
  • An increased risk for PD was observed in non-drinkers (0 or
  • Women who consumed >14 drinks per week showed no significant difference in risks for PD compared with women who drank 1-2 drinks per week:
    • aRR, 0.99 (95% CI, 0.90-1.10).
  • Similar findings were noted after excluding the first 10 years of follow-up:
    • >14 drinks per week vs 1-2 drinks per week: aRR, 1.01 (95% CI, 0.90-1.13).
  • No association between the type of alcohol intake and PD risk was noted.
  • Again, in never smokers, no significant trends among alcohol-related PD risks were found.

Limitations

  • Limited generalisability of findings.