Does high dietary magnesium intake prevent coronary heart disease?

  • Gant CM & al.
  • Nutrients
  • 5 Mar 2018

  • from Sarfaroj Khan
  • Clinical Summaries
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Takeaway

  • In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), higher magnesium (Mg) intake, higher 24-hour urinary Mg excretion, and higher plasma Mg concentration are associated with a low prevalence of coronary heart disease (CHD).

Why this matters

  • Only a few studies have assessed the relation between association with vegetable-derived Mg intake and CHD in patients with T2DM.
  • Animal studies show that high Mg status inhibits vascular calcification and low Mg status cause cardiac arrhythmias.

Study design

  • Cross-sectional analysis of 450 patients (CHD, n=100; no CHD, n=350) with T2DM from the DIAbetes and LifEstyle Cohort Twente-1 (DIALECT-1).
  • Patients were evaluated using the Short QUestionnaire to ASses Health enhancing physical activity (SQUASH) questionnaire and semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire.
  • Funding: None.

Key results

  • Significant correlation between dietary Mg intake and 24-hour urinary Mg excretion (P<.001 was observed but not with plasma mg and urinary excretion significantly correlated>
  • After adjustments, CHD prevalence was significantly lower with high Mg intake (prevalence ratio [PR], 0.40), high 24-hour urinary Mg excretion (PR, 0.63) and high plasma Mg concentration (PR, 0.62).
  • Non-significant reduction in CHD prevalence was seen with every 10 mg of dietary Mg intake derived from vegetables (PR, 0.75).

Limitations

  • Risk for bias.