Does high-dose vitamin D supplementation prevents allergic sensitisation of infants?

  • Rosendahl J & al.
  • J Pediatr
  • 1 Jun 2019

  • curated by Sarfaroj Khan
  • UK Clinical Digest
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Takeaway

  • High-dose vitamin D supplementation did not decrease allergic sensitisation, allergic diseases or wheezing during the first year of life in vitamin D-sufficient infants.
  • In contrast, infants who received vitamin D supplementation had an increased risk for milk allergy, and an increased risk for allergic sensitisation was observed in infants with high cord blood vitamin D status.

Why this matters

  • Observational studies have suggested a link between vitamin D status at birth and the development of allergic diseases. However, the results of these studies are inconsistent.

Study design

  • Secondary analysis of the Vitamin D Intervention in Infants (VIDI) study; 975 infants who were randomly assigned to receive vitamin D 10 µg (400 IU; n=489) and 30 µg (1200 IU; n=486) daily from the age of 2 weeks.
  • The risk for IgE sensitisation to food allergens and aeroallergen and the occurrence of allergic diseases and wheezing were evaluated at 12 months of age.
  • Funding: Foundation for Pediatric Research; Finnish Medical Foundation and others.

Key results

  • At 12 months, no differences in IgE sensitisation to food (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.66-1.46; P=.910) and aeroallergens (OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.34-1.71; P=.509) between the intervention groups
  • The occurrence of allergic diseases or wheezing did not differ between groups, except for milk allergy which was reported more often in infants who received vitamin D 30 µg vs 10 µg dose (OR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.00-4.96; P=.044).
  • The risk for food allergen sensitisation was 2-fold higher in infants with high cord blood 25(OH)D (≥100 nmol/L) vs those with lower 25(OH)D concentration (75-99.9 nmol/L) (OR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.19-3.39; P=.009).

Limitations

  • Secondary analysis of a trial with sample size not computed for the allergy outcomes.